E r i c R o b e r t s o n

contact info: Emial

b. 1959, Vancouver, British Columbia

First Nations Affiliation:

Métis/Gitksan

Eric Robertson grew up in Vancouver, where he met several active Northwest Coast artists and began to work in the conventional Northwest Coast style. These qualities of materials, craftsmanship and design continue to inform his subtle and elegant work which questions the dominant version of history in an attempt to renegotiate contemporary realities. A former Fisheries Officer, Robertson was an Honours Graduate, Major in Three Dimensional Studies, from Emily Carr College of Art and Design in 1988, and received an M.F.A. from Concordia University in Montréal, Québec in 1992. While pursuing these studies, he won scholarships from the government of British Columbia, Emily Carr College, and Concordia. His work Bearings and Demeanours (1990), is in the collection of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Robertson has instructed at the En'owkin Centre in Penticton, British Columbia, and is a founding member of the Nation to Nation collective.

Recent pieces


R E C E N T E X H I B I T I O N S

1996 Métissages.
Galerie Optica, Montréal, Québec
The Space Between II.
Centre Saidye Bronfman, Montréal, Québec


1995 Nations in Urban Landscapes.
Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, British Columbia; and Oboro, Montréal, Québec (travelling)
Native Love.
Montréal, Québec


1994 Indian Time.
Brandt Klaefabrik, Odense, Denmark
Métissage.
St. Jean Port-Joli, Québec

Nation to Nation Presents: Vision to Vision.
McGill University, Montréal, Québec


1993 Whapmagoostui/Grande Baleine: temoignages de dix artistes visuels canadiens.
Maison de la Culture Mont-Royal, Montréal, Québec (travelling )

1992 Le dessin rebelle / Rebellious drawing.
Centre Saidye Bronfman, Montréal, Québec

INDIGENA.
Canadian Museum of Civilization, Hull, Québec

New Territories: 350/500 Years After.
Les Maisons de la Culture, Montréal, Québec

Circa Gallery, Montréal, Québec

Great Whale 3.
Maison de la Culture Mont Royal, Montréal, Québec

Great Whale 2.
Burlington University, Vermont


1991 A force de terre.
Circa - art ceramique contemporain, Montréal, Québec



S E L E C T E D C O L L E C T I O N S

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario



S E L E C T E D B I B L I O G R A P H Y

Bernatchez, Raymond. "Le discours ecologiste prend forme . . . d'art." La Presse, 30 June 1991, p. C-6.

Catchlove, Lucinda. "Spacey." Hour, 3-9 August 1995, p. 15.

Cron, Marie-Michele. "A force de se taire." Le Devoir, 29 June 1991, p. B-9.

Crosby, Marcia and Paul Chaat Smith. Nations in Urban Landscapes. Vancouver, British Columbia: Contemporary Art Gallery, 1997.

Delagrave, Marie. "Une explosion choque qui remet les pendules a l’heure." Le Soleil, 26 September 1992, p. F-5.

DeMott, Barbara. Beyond the Revival: Contemporary Northwest Coast Native Art. Vancouver, British Columbia: Charles H. Scott Gallery, 1989.

Le dessin rebelle / Rebellious drawing. Montréal, Québec: Centre Saidye Bronfman, 1992.

Dumont, Jean. "L’archeologie des lieux." Le Devoir, 21 May 1992, p. B-9.

Durand, Guy Sioui. "Creative currents: Métissage merges Native and non-Native creativity." Aboriginal Voices 1, no. 4 (Fall 1994): 42-45.

Fraser, Marie, Guy Sioui Durand, et al. Métissages. Saint-Jean-de-Jolie, Québec: Centre de Sculpture, 1996.

Gravel, Claire. "Eric Robertson: la reconstruction de l’histoire." Vie des arts, no. 147 (Summer 1992): 38-41.

Maskegon-Iskwew, Ahasiw. "Native love: Subverting the boundaries of the heart." FUSE Magazine 19, no. 4 (Summer 1996): 24-33.

McMaster, Gerald R. "INDIGENA: A Native curator's perspective." Art Journal 51, no. 3. (Fall 1992): 66-73.

McMaster, Gerald, and Lee-Ann Martin, eds. INDIGENA: Contemporary Native Perspectives. Vancouver, British Columbia: Douglas & McIntyre, 1992./ INDIGENA: Perspectives autochtones contemporaines. Hull, Québec: Musée canadien des civilisations, 1992.

Merette, Myriam. "La planete des signes." Voir, 18 July 1991, p. 11.

"Nations in urban landscapes." Parachute 84 (October/November/December 1996): 64. [Review: Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver]



This exhibition is an installation of multiple cast aluminum Eulachon framed and suspended from the ceiling.

Eulachon (ool-a-kin), a member of the smelt family, has always been prized by coastal and interior people. Their rendered oil was used for food, medicine and trade.


Artist Statement

This work is in celebration of Eulachon. Eulachon are small fish that reproduce in the major river systems on the West Coast. Their use has maintained a substantial role in cultural exchange, trade and commerce. This cultural exchange continues above the old intersecting travel routes known as "Grease Trails," which are today, the foundations of the provinces major transportation highways.

Eric Robertson

Special thanks to the following: Winona Scott, Jody Sparrow, Oliver Haskle, Tale'awtxw Aboriginal Capital Corporation. With respect to the Okanagan First Nation.


Eric Robertson is a Vancouver based installation artist. He graduated with honours at Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in 1988 and completed a Masters of Fine Arts at Concordia University in 1992. Robertson has exhibited since 1988 and his work has travelled Canada, United States, Peru, Denmark, and Korea. Drawing from First Nations (Gitksan) and mixed Euro-Canadian ancestry, his work is a personal exploration into the historical and contemporary dynamics of these relationships.


Installation Photo

The Hub. Aluminum, stainless steel and copper. 2001


 

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