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Todd Jason Baker

eagle
Todd Baker
'Eagle'
  • Limited edition Silkscreen of 300
  • two colors
  • printed on 245 gsm Stonehenge white 100% cotton paper
  • Image size 18" x 19" w/ signature
  • paper size 22" x 26"
  • released JUNE, 2008
  • free shipping
  • 100% satisfaction guaranteed $149.00
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Eagle legend and definitions

    Eagle is respected for its intelligence and power, as well as its extraordinary vision, in both the literal and figurative senses.

    Eagle clan families are traditionally the most prominent, and Eagle chiefs the most powerful.

    Eagles in myth are, likewise, usually noble characters. Eagle spirits are associated with lofty ideals and the pursuit of freedom.

    Eagle is revered as a powerful hunter. Groups of mythical Eagles may gather for co-operative whale hunting expeditions, since, unlike the giant Thunderbird, Eagle is not strong enough to hunt whales alone. Eagle may often be depicted with Salmon, one of its favorite foods.

    Eagle feathers and down are sacred: traditionally, shamans believed in their healing powers and used them in a variety of ceremonial and ritual contexts, such as honoring a respected guest.

    In some Haida myths and legends, Eagle and Raven are close companions and serve as alter egos to one another They are two halves of the great whole, often divided and often united. They are technically equals.

    In this design of the Eagle his beautiful, high-ranking legendary wife and the two children Eagle bore with her are incorporated in his wings.

 

     
 

 

 

Limited Edition Print of the 'Eagle'

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click on photo for close ups!

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Native Eagle Definitions

Eagle is respected for its intelligence and power, as well as its extraordinary vision, in both the literal and figurative senses.
    Eagle clan families are traditionally the most prominent, and Eagle chiefs the most powerful. Eagles in myth are, likewise, usually noble characters. Eagle spirits are associated with lofty ideals and the pursuit of freedom.
    Eagle is revered as a powerful hunter. Groups of mythical Eagles may gather for co-operative whale hunting expeditions, since, unlike the giant Thunderbird, Eagle is not strong enough to hunt whales alone. Eagle may often be depicted with Salmon, one of its favorite foods.
    Eagle feathers and down are sacred: traditionally, shamans believed in their healing powers and used them in a variety of ceremonial and ritual contexts, such as honoring a respected guest.
    In some Haida myths and legends, Eagle and Raven are close companions and serve as alter egos to one another They are two halves of the great whole, often divided and often united. They are technically equals.
    In this design of the Eagle his beautiful, high-ranking legendary wife and the two children Eagle bore with her are incorporated in his wings.
  • Eagle Feather And Significance

  • Most all Native American Indian Peoples attach special significance to the Eagle and its feathers. Images of eagles and their feathers are used on many tribal logos as symbols of the Native American Indian. To be given an Eagle feather is the highest honor that can be awarded within indigenous cultures.

Both Bald and Golden Eagles (and their feathers) are highly revered and considered sacred within American Indian traditions, culture and religion. They are honored with great care and shown the deepest respect. They represent honesty, truth, majesty, strength, courage, wisdom, power and freedom. As they roam the sky, they are believed to have a special connection to God.

According to traditional American Indian beliefs, the Creator made all the birds of the sky when the World was new. Of all the birds, the Creator chose the Eagle to be the leader... the Master of the Sky.

The Eagle flies higher and sees better than any other bird. Therefore, its perspective is different from other creations that are held close to the Earth, and it is closer to the Creator. The Creator also has a different perspective of what occurs below in this world of physical things in which humankind resides. The Eagle spends more time in the higher element of Father Sky than other birds, and Father Sky is an element of the Spirit.

The Eagle is considered to be a messenger to God. It was given the honor of carrying the prayers of man between the World of Earth and the World of Spirit, where the Creator and grandfathers reside. To wear or hold an Eagle feather causes the Creator to take immediate notice. With the Eagle feather, the Creator is honored in the highest way.

The wings of an Eagle represent the balance needed between male and female, each one dependent upon the strengths and abilities of the other.

When one receives an Eagle feather, that person is being acknowledged with gratitude, love and ultimate respect. The holder of the feather must ensure that anything that changes one’s state of mind (alcohol and drugs) must never come in contact with a sacred Eagle feather.

The keeper of an Eagle feather makes a little home where the feather will be kept safely and protected. It should be hung up within one’s home, not placed in drawers or cupboards.

Eagle feathers are never to be abused, shown disrespect, dropped or contaminated. Only real true human Men and Women carry the Eagle feather.

Many dancers use Eagle feathers as part of their dance regalia. The Creek and Cherokee have an Eagle Dance. If for any reason an eagle feather is dropped, it needs to be cleansed. The arena director’s job is to guard the Eagle feather and not leave the spot it is in until the proper cleansing ceremony is performed.

Eagle feathers were awarded to Indian Braves, warriors and Chieftains for extreme acts of valor and bravery. These feathers were difficult to come by, and were earned one at a time.

Regardless of where or how an Indian Brave accumulated Eagle feathers, he was not allowed, according to Tribal Law, to wear them until he won them by a brave deed. He had to appear before the Tribal Council and tell or reenact his exploit. Witnesses were examined and, if in the eyes of the council, the deed was thought worthy, the Indian Brave was then allowed to wear the feathers in his hair or Indian Headdress or Indian War Bonnet.

An Indian would rather part with his horse or tepee, than to lose his Eagle feathers. To do so would be dishonor in the eyes of his Tribe. Many of the old American Indian Chiefs had won enough honors to wear a double-trailed bonnet that dragged the ground. Only the great and important men of the Tribes had the right to wear the double-trailed Indian War Bonnets.

During the “Four Sacred Rituals”, American Indians wear or hold Eagle feathers. The “Flag Song” has its earliest origins during the period when some Indian Nations would honor the Eagle feather staffs of leaders from different other bands of Indian Nations.

Under both U.S. and Canadian law, a permit is required from official governmental conservation authorities of anyone to possess an Eagle feather legally. Native American Indians acquiring Bald and Golden Eagle feathers must use them for traditional ceremonies or teaching purposes.

Under normal circumstances, it is illegal to use, sell or possess Eagle feathers. Anyone possessing an Eagle feather without a federal permit can face stiff fines and imprisonment.

The American Indian holds the Eagle in the highest regard, and has a true "heart and soul desire" to keep it flying healthy and free for many generations to come.

Prophesy says that it is time to share some of the sacred traditions of our culture. The four colors of man will be coming together to unite and heal. Creator has given different gifts and responsibilities to each of the four colors. Ours is to help preserve Earth for all the children. Time is running out. It’s time to act.”
         
- Indigenous Spiritual Leaders of the Americas -


Testimonials
 Raven landed safely!!!
Hi Todd,
Just to let you know that Raven landed safely here about 20 minutes ago. I am very impressed and more than satisfied :o) and as soon as the darn rain stops I'll be off out to purchase a frame so it can take pride of place on my wall.
I found the extra info included fascinating and to have Bill Reid critique your first piece must have been an honor for you. It also made me realize that I only understand a tiny portion of your cultures legends myths and beliefs etc. I would like to find out a lot more so maybe you could recommend a good book or web site which you consider to give a good insight and historical account or your peoples. Not too many months ago I purchased an analysis of form by Bill Holm but that mainly concentrates on the art form itself and not the beliefs and culture etc. The other books I have mainly contain just art without much background info unless it's showing something major like a Skidgate House. So anything you may be able to recommend will be greatly appreciated, thanks once again it's been a pleasure dealing with you.
Kind Regards, Mark, UK
 
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